Judy Blume cannot be trusted with our children.

Although Judy Blume has become a popular children’s author, she is not an author we can trust our children with.  With her popularity, schools like ours are requiring the children to read her books.  In our school, children were introduced to Judy Blume book, “Tales of a fourth grade nothing” as an all class read together in third grade.  In fourth grade they delve deeper into Judy Blume by studying her book as class, “Judy Blume: otherwise known as Sheila the great.”  This is alarming, because once children like a book, they’ll continue to find more books by the same author.  Her books for younger audience like the above contain sibling rivalry, lying, problems with self-image, boy craziness, all of which are not directing our children towards the moral good.  In my further research, this is just the tip of the iceberg, her books for older children takes a turn for the worse with topics such as masturbation, premarital sex, bullying, all without resolve.

Children are vulnerable since they are at an impressionable age where they start to care about how they are perceived.   Hence, the damage caused by these books are even greater. Here are a few examples from some of her books with why our children shouldn’t read them in their formative years.

Deenie – In this book, Blume presents masturbation as a good feeling when you touch your special place.  The main character touches herself every night since it was the only way she could fall asleep.

Are you there, God? It’s me Margaret – the main character doesn’t find God after searching in religion. The book is an exploration of the main characters, puberty and sexuality.  Readers are introduced to playboy magazines and kissing games with boys in a manner one could say, intro to sexual promiscuity.

Blubber – Here she writes about an overweight girl being bullied and having her underwear exposed.  There are several profane and crude language introduced such as calling teacher Bi*ch.  Bullying is not punished.  No morals learned.

Forever – This book explores teen pre-marital teenage intercourse and birth control.  In Judy’s own words, “A book where two nice kids do it and nobody has to die.”  Book is popular in today’s culture because it teaches children that it’s ok to have sex as long as you go to planned parenthood for birth control pills and do it responsibly.  What about abstinence and waiting till you are married?  It is never mentioned.  Book contains a character peripheral to the story who is unsure of his sexual orientation and is suicidal.  Further detailed review can be found here: http://www.pluggedin.com/book-reviews/forever

Tiger Eyes  – detailed review can be found here: http://www.pluggedin.com/book-reviews/tiger-eyes/

Then Again, Maybe I won’t – This book explores male puberty.  Here the main character looks at girl next door undressing and masturbates.  Although he wonders at the end of book whether to stop but as title suggests, he decides, Then again, maybe I won’t.

Judy Blume is also an open supporter of the Planned Parenthood and she uses her books to promote her ideas.  On May 5, 2009, Judy wrote an open letter supporting Planned Parenthood, with the title cleverly headed “Are you there [Your Name Here]? It’s me, Judy,” referencing her book, “Are you There God? It’s Me Margaret”.  Contents of the email were to solicit donation funds for Planned Parenthood in honor of mother’s on Mother’s day.  Full email can be viewed here on catholic key: http://catholickey.blogspot.com/2009/05/judy-blume-honor-mom-by-supporting.html

When the secular world outside is bombarding our children with negative ideas of marriage, family and sexuality, let’s not buy into it by supporting authors like Judy Blume.  Instead let’s work together in our homes and schools to counter that with wholesome children’s books portraying families where sacrificial life giving love is nurtured.

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